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Archive for December, 2018

December 20th, 2018 by admin

Speaking medicine to get to zero

SLAM POET: Gabrielle Journey Jones will highlight South Coast Writers Centre’s Spoken Medicine workshop in Wollongong on October 22.A workshop in Wollongong in late October is the first of many South Coast Writers Centre events to mark World Aids Day.
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The SCWC is also again running a writing competition, which this year has evolved intoa multimedia competition, open to video blogs, songwriting, poetry and prose.

‘Getting to Zero: zero new HIV infections; zero deaths from AIDS; zero discrimination’, is the World Aids Day theme in 2016.

The SCWC competition howeveris open to any subjects loosely relating to ‘Down to Zero’.

The centre will run athree-hour workshop called ‘Spoken Medicine’to kick start the competition – which runs from October 22 to November 22.

The workshopwill be held at New Outlook Community Centre’s premises at 3 Station Street, Wollongong on Saturday, October 22 from 1-4pm.

Slam poet Gabrielle Journey Jones will speak at the event and explore poetry and prose around the theme of HIV AIDS and well-being.

The workshop will alsoinclude an introduction to performance poetry as well as creative writing.

Jones is the CEO of Creative Womyn Down Under, a community initiative which helps to connect women and creativity.

She has been passionate about using spoken word andperformance poetry and drumming to raise social issues for over 20 years.

During this time, Joneshas also been involved with many not-for-profit community organisations and government agencies across Australia in her professional role as a social worker.

She has developed many interesting ways to incorporate creativity into social work projects.

Jones demonstrated her unique hip-hop style of drumming and poetry recently at the live poetry and music monthly event Say It Sing It, run by the SCWC and Wollongong City Council, with a hilarious and moving winning performance.

World AIDS Dayis held on December 1 each year. It raises awareness across the world and in the community about the issues surrounding HIV and AIDS.

A SCWC spokeswoman said the workshop will be a great starting point for people who have stories to share for World Aids Day but need a bit of help getting started with their writing.

Workshop tickets cost $10/$5. They can be purchased on the day.

Competition winners willbe announced on the SCWC website and at the end of year picnic, which will include performances and readings.

To submit an entry or for more details [email protected]论坛, call 4228 1021 or visitsouthcoastwriters.org419论坛/

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

December 20th, 2018 by admin

Businesses welcome fans

BUSINESS BOOM: Rydges Mount Panorama general manager Shawn Pyne says the Bathurst 1000 is fantastic for the local economy and it gives the city exposure. Photo: PHIL BLATCH 100616pbshawn4BATHURST’s business sector hastold locals they are mad not to welcomethe huge economic boost that fans of the Great Race bringto the city each year.
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Full house signs have goneup across Bathurst withrestaurants, cafes, bottle shops and hoteliers rejoicing with establishments full of customers.

Kings Hotel manager Tim Fagan said that any locals who are not supportive ofthe Bathurst 1000and the many fans the event brings only have to look at the economic impact on the city.

After 10 years of working in Bathurst’s hospitality sector, he said it is a huge money-spinner for the city.

“It’s massive and if you don’t take advantage of it you’re mad,” Mr Fagan said.

“Instead of whinging about it we should embrace it.”

Research shows the Bathurst 1000 has a huge economic benefit for the city, with astaggering $25.89 million injectedinto the city’s economyeach year, Western Research Institute general manager Wendy Mason.

It is the equivalent of $6.47m for each of the four main days of the event.

“There’s clearly impact felt across numerous industries including retail, hospitality, transport, petroland entertainment,” Ms Mason said.

Western Research Institute general manager Wendy MasonThis story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

December 20th, 2018 by admin

Sports fields report request

Looking to the future: The October 5 council meeting noted an offer for the council to buy Chase Parklands-owned land at Tuffins Lane and requested a report detailing alternate options to provide regional sports fields.ALTERNATIVEoptions to provideregional sportsfields will be examined amid uncertainty over the future of the Tuffins Lane fields.
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Port Macquarie-Hastings Council has considered a report discussing an offer from land owner Chase Parklands for the council to buy their land at Tuffins Lane.

The matter was considered behind closed doors at the October 5 council meeting for commercial in-confidence reasons.

The council noted the offer and the attached conditions.

Councillors requested general manager CraigSwift-McNairbring back a report to the October 19 council meeting detailing alternate options to provide regional sports fields within the local government area.

Port Macquarie-Hastings mayor Peter Besseling said the council needed to look for thethe long-term future of a large regional sports field complex.

“Tuffins Lane has serious constraints that are well known to all sports groups, and State Cup aswell, and among them are drainage issues, lack of lighting and parking,” he said.

“It’s no more than looking at longer term options for the region but obviously we will need to take into account the shorter terms needs of the sporting community.”

The council hasreceived18 months’ notice to vacate the TuffinsLane leased sports fields.

The council has leased the Tuffins Lane site for years.

The 18 months’ notice to vacate extends to early March 2018.

The Tuffins Lane precinct is home to the Hastings River Junior District Cricket Association, along with Port Macquarie touch football, oz tag as well as two local football clubs.

Port Macquarie Touch Association referees director Greg Oaten urged the council to plan for the future or put at risk sporting competitions includingthe junior and senior state cups.

Port Macquarie Tourism Association president Janette Hyde said the junior and senior state cups were vital to our economy.

“The tourism industry would strongly support any move by council to fix the current dilemma,” she said about the Tuffins Laneissue.

The junior and senior state cups inject millions of dollars into the economy.

The council has an endorsedRecreation Action Plan which runs through to 2025.

Theplan aims to provide the council with the framework to caterfor the short to medium term provision of recreational facilities.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

December 20th, 2018 by admin

Live coverage of the Royal Launceston Show

UPDATE 4.30pm:
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The Examiner team are pulling together our coverage of the show, including results from the agricultural competitions, a first-person experience piece and an update with the show organiser.

Our photographer Scott Gelston will soon upload a gallery of pictures taken throughout the day.

Check back soon.

UPDATE 4pm:

While everyone was lining up to grab their showbags,The Examiner Editor Simon Tennant and photographer Scott Gelston were “testing out” the rides.

The show is open until 5pm.

[email protected] Editor @Simon_Tennant and photographer @Burntscotty testing out the rides at Royal Launceston show pic.twitter南京夜网/WBcYazC7PX

— Melissa Mobbs (@melissamobbs) October 6, 2016Dog judging at the Royal Launceston Show. @ExaminerOnlinepic.twitter南京夜网/zibSRTnv3s

— Holly Monery (@holly_monery) October 6, 2016Youth cattle handling at the Royal Launceston Show @ExaminerOnlinepic.twitter南京夜网/Ea53pZeDcl

— Holly Monery (@holly_monery) October 6, 2016

The Examiner will be bringing you live coverage of the animal nursery,sideshow alley,live stock competitions and, for all those daredevils, the enormous rides.

For the first time, the show will featureone of the largest mobile ferris wheels in Australia.

Treat your taste buds to traditional show favourites like the dagwood dog and fairy floss.

With the largest livestock entries on record, the agricultural sections are set to be a highlight.

The show will be held at the Launceston Showgrounds,Inveresk from 8.30am to 5pm on Thursday and Saturday.

The event will run from 8.30am to9.30pm onFriday.

For more information go to梧桐夜网launcestonshowground南京夜网419论坛/.

Stay tuned for live updates.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

December 20th, 2018 by admin

More cash for bat camp planPHOTOS, VIDEO

COLONY: Parliamentary Secretary for the Hunter, Scot MacDonald, and Cessnock Mayor Bob Pynsent inspect the damage the bats have done to trees in East Cessnock. Picture: KRYSTAL SELLARSThe flying foxes have all but left East Cessnock –for now.
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But residents may have to suffer through another summer with these unwanted neighbours while a plan is put together to manage the bat camp.

Cessnock CityCouncil has received a total of $25,000 for the plan, which is expected to be complete by April.

Bats have taken up residence on a parcel of Crown land in East Cessnock each summer for the past five years or so.

Last summer the colony tripled in size to approximately 30,000 –causing grief for nearby residents with noise, smell and mess.

The bats spread across Old Maitland Road into a council reserve at the end of Anzac Avenue, and into bushland on the opposite side of Maitland Road towards Neath–and some hung around into the winter months.

The site was lit on fire four times in the space of two weeks in May.

Hundreds of trees in the area have been almost stripped bare and while the bats appear to have gone west for the winter, they could be back within a number of weeks.

Flying foxes at East Cessnock in February 2016Council received a $15,000 NSW Government grant on Wednesday to help prepare a management plan for the flying fox camp –on top of the$10,000it received from theOffice of Environment and Heritage in May.

If the council adopts a camp management plan, it will be eligible to apply for further funding to implement measures as part of the plan under the Flying Fox Grants Program.

The NSW Government announced in June that $1 million in grant funds would be available for councils to prepare and implement flying fox camp plans of management where there were significant community impacts.

Parliamentary Secretary for the Hunter Scot MacDonaldinspected the East Cessnock camp in June this year andmade representations to environment ministerMark Speakman after his visit.

Mr MacDonaldsaid thecouncil can consider a range of options in its plan to manage flying foxes (which are a protectedspecies in Australia).

These options includevegetation trimming orremoval to create buffer zones or,as a last resort, the councilcouldapply to disperse the camp.

Cessnock Mayor Bob Pynsent welcomed the support of the State Government on an issue thatcontinues to concern the community, particularly those residents living directly adjacent to the camp.

“This additional funding is crucial to the establishment of a plan that will guide actions to mitigate impacts of flying-foxes on the community,”Cr Pynsent said.

The planwill help build on council’s community surveyFlyingfox Engage, which is open for comment until October 17.

Cr Pynsent said all responses from the survey willbe considered as a key part of the management plan.

The survey can be taken atflyingfoxengage南京夜网/eastcessnock.

More cash for bat camp plan | PHOTOS, VIDEO Picture: Rachelle Corcoran

Bats at Carrington. Picture: Susan Mitchell

Picture: ShayLeigh Riddle

Bats on the barricades at Burdekin Park.

Picture: ShayLeigh Riddle

Behind Cessnock East Public School. Picture: Emmie Price

Picture: Kimberly Johnson

Dead bats near East Cessnock School. Picture: Michelle Bond

Picture: Crystal Maree Norden

Picture: Daniel Radford

Picture: Kylie Radford

Picture: Kylie Radford

Picture: Kylie Radford

What the trees look like now. Picture: Kylie Radford

Where there once were branches there are now just bats. Picture: Kylie Radford

Taken Cessnock Bat Camp. Picture: April Hatchamana

Taken Cessnock Bat Camp. Picture: April Hatchamana

Taken Cessnock Bat Camp. Picture: April Hatchamana

Taken Cessnock Bat Camp. Picture: April Hatchamana

Picture: Candice Preece

Candice Preece13 hrs ·

Picture: Tiarna Croft

Picture: Walter Upson

Picture: Walter Upson

Picture: Walter Upson

Picture: Dyarnie Riddock

Picture: Neil Lyle

INSTA @ynot_young_nomads_on_tour_ #battyhunter #battyhunters

Fried bat in Blackwood Avenue. Picture: Nathan Wright

Bats and damage in Burdekin Park, Singleton. Pictures: Shannon Dann

Bats and damage in Burdekin Park, Singleton. Pictures: Shannon Dann

Bats and damage in Burdekin Park, Singleton. Pictures: Shannon Dann

Bats and damage in Burdekin Park, Singleton. Pictures: Shannon Dann

Bats and damage in Burdekin Park, Singleton. Pictures: Shannon Dann

Bats and damage in Burdekin Park, Singleton. Pictures: Shannon Dann

Bats and damage in Burdekin Park, Singleton. Pictures: Shannon Dann

Bats and damage in Burdekin Park, Singleton. Pictures: Shannon Dann

Bats and damage in Burdekin Park, Singleton. Pictures: Shannon Dann

Bats and damage in Burdekin Park, Singleton. Pictures: Shannon Dann

Bats and damage in Burdekin Park, Singleton. Pictures: Shannon Dann

Bats and damage in Burdekin Park, Singleton. Pictures: Shannon Dann

Bats and damage in Burdekin Park, Singleton. Pictures: Shannon Dann

Bats and damage in Burdekin Park, Singleton. Pictures: Shannon Dann

Bats and damage in Burdekin Park, Singleton. Pictures: Shannon Dann

Bats and damage in Burdekin Park, Singleton. Pictures: Shannon Dann

Bats and damage in Burdekin Park, Singleton. Pictures: Shannon Dann

Bats and damage in Burdekin Park, Singleton. Pictures: Shannon Dann

Bats and damage in Burdekin Park, Singleton. Pictures: Shannon Dann

Bats and damage in Burdekin Park, Singleton. Pictures: Shannon Dann

Bats and damage in Burdekin Park, Singleton. Pictures: Shannon Dann

Bats and damage in Burdekin Park, Singleton. Pictures: Shannon Dann

Bats and damage in Burdekin Park, Singleton. Pictures: Shannon Dann

Bats and damage in Burdekin Park, Singleton. Pictures: Shannon Dann

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This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.